Season-Extending Garden Techniques...

Thursday, November 1, 2012 by

Article Published by the National Garden Bureau Few gardeners are content with the length of their growing season. In the far North, there’s barely enough time to ripen tomatoes or melons. In the South, drought and intense heat limit gardening activity to the spring and fall months. The good news is that by using a few simple season-extending techniques and plant-protection devices, you can shield your plants from extremes of weather, and stretch your gardening season by two, three or even six months. Wind: If the plants in your garden must battle strong winds, they’ll need to use most of their energy to survive, rather than developing strong root systems and putting on healthy growth. To protect your garden from wind, you can build a wood fence, plant a windbreak of trees and shrubs,...

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Gardening with Physical Limitations...

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 by

Article by National Garden Bureau   Let’s face it, gardeners age. Or, are afflicted with illnesses that can make gardening more difficult and less enjoyable. However, thanks to creative and inventive minds, there are now a wide variety of excellent tools and techniques to take some of the aches and pains out of gardening. Following are a few techniques we’ve found that offer great advice for improving your gardening ability despite physical limitations. Special thanks to the Chicago Botanic Garden for all the examples they show in their Buehler Enabling Garden. Know your limits. Be aware of just how much physical activity you can manage and ask for help when needed. Use the right tools. Act like an athlete! In other words, do a little warm-up activity before you begin gardening and give yourself...

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Sow Seeds Now for an Easy and Delicious Fall Garden...

Tuesday, August 16, 2011 by

Provided by National Garden Bureau Late summer is the ideal time to start your fall garden. In most areas of the country, you can grow a “second season” crop of your favorite cool-season vegetables and lovely fall flowers. In mild winter areas, you can grow even more garden favorites for harvest in late fall, winter, even into next spring. Now is the time to gear up for some of the best growing weather of the year, which lies in the cool season ahead. What to Grow Many casual gardeners don’t bother to plant later in the summer because they think of a garden as something to be planted in spring. The Home Garden Seed Association (HGSA) is out to change that mindset, along with the idea that growing plants from seed is difficult. The...

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Green Education for Klehm Members...

Tuesday, August 9, 2011 by

Klehm Members and friends are invited to attend “From Green Roofs to Fields of Flowers – Designing, Specifying, Installing and Managing the LEED Landscape” by U.S. Green Building Council – Rockford/Northern Illinois Branch The program is August 31, 2011 5:30pm – 8:00pm and conveniently located at Klehm Arboretum.  Klehm Members receive a discount of $10 and non-members can attend for $20. Program summary: “Utilizing the Sustainable Sites Initiative guidelines and 22 years of ecological restoration experience, we will discuss the reasons for sustainable landscaping and how best to achieve and maintain ecological stability on new and redeveloped sites. Green Roofs and native flora, bio-swales, erosion control and storm water manage- ment are just some of the pieces that go into solving the water quality issues being addressed by civic leaders, property owners and land developers, scientists,...

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Project Noah

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 by

Be a Citizen Scientist – Documenting & Discovering Nature When you visit projectnoah.org  you will discover “… a tool to explore and document wildlife and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere.”  Everyday technology brings new ways for the average non-scientist to support nature.  In 2010 Project Noah launched becoming a great resource for those who care and want to contribute.  Their site provides phone apps and web resources to track plant and wildlife, manage and record sightings, and get involved with local “missions” which focus on anything natural from documenting mushrooms to endangered species.  Plus, they offer users the chance to submit photos for identification.  Visit projectnoah.org and discover your chance to support plant and wildlife research and...

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